Interested in being a Mentor?

Benefits

  • Expand your comfort zone: collaborate with NACADA members from a wide range of institutions
  • Meet inspirational members interested in contributing to the future of NACADA
  • Give back to NACADA
  • Help colleagues understand how NACADA works
  • Enrich your mentoring skills through participation in a structured program
  • Assist colleagues as they work to meet their professional goals
  • Increase your connection to NACADA

Requirements

The requirements for Mentors are:

  • At the time of application, must have been a member of NACADA for at least two years and be a current member.
  • Must agree to a two-year obligation as a Mentor and secure institutional support to be a part of the program.
  • Must be either a current or past NACADA Leader. This can be at the regional or national level; in an elected or appointed position (chair of a committee, advisory board, task force, Region, Commission, Interest Group); and/or a leader in the research and/or publications arenas.
  • Must be willing to provide guidance and support for assigned Emerging Leader in the creation of a written plan.
  • Must agree to provide feedback on Emerging Leader's progress reports.
  • Must be willing and able to attend online meetings in the Zoom environment during the summer prior to the program period beginning to become acquainted with potential mentees.
  • Must be willing and able to attend at least one annual conference, at Mentor's expense, to be paired with Emerging Leader. Applicants for the 2018-2020 Class MUST be able to attend the 2018 Annual Conference in Phoenix, AZ and may not be able to be involved in afternoon pre-conference workshops.  (ELP Orientation and pairing will take place on 'pre-conference day' and it is possible timing may not allow pre-con participation.)  If at all possible, mentors will also be expected to attend the 2019 Conference in Louisville, KY and/or the 2020 Conference in San Juan, PR (where the ELP Class will be awarded Certificates of Completion).  Attendance at other NACADA events is encouraged, but not required.  The Mentor and Emerging Leader will determine the method of communication that will work best for their situation over the two years of their work together following their pairing at Annual Conference.
  • Must agree to conduct evaluation of Emerging Leader and program at the end of each year and report those evaluations to NACADA.

Application Process

We encourage you to apply to be NACADA Mentor! 

The application period for the 2018-2020 Class begins on January 15, 2018; for consideration by the selection committee for the 2018-2020 Class, please submit your completed application packet via the web portal.

We encourage applicants to begin thinking and preparing application materials well in advance of the deadline. Applicants are required to respond to the following questions (in PDF format):
  • What leadership role(s) have you had in NACADA and how long were you in each role? Please simply list these roles.
  • Of the above leadership roles, please speak to the one that had most meaning for you.  What was special about this role and why is it significant to you.
  • Why do you want to serve as a mentor for the Emerging Leader program?
  • What is the value of a mentoring relationship for both the mentor and the mentee? Please use in your answer any experiences you have had in a mentoring relationship.

At the time of application, applicants will also be required to upload the following, in PDF format:

  • Letter of recommendation from another NACADA member who can attest to your leadership in the association and articulate support for your readiness to serve as a mentor.

Online Application Submission

  • Gather the required application materials prior to starting your submission.
  • Make sure that the application materials are saved in PDF format.
  • Access the Online Submission Portal using Internet Explorer (will be available January 15 - March 15, 2018 for the 2018-2020 Class).
  • Enter a password - this can be simple and you can use the same one for other NACADA award submissions.
  • In the “Type” section, select the radial button for Emerging Leaders Program (ELP).
  • From the drop-down list under “Category,” select Mentor.
  • Be sure to write down your Application Nomination Number and your password so if you have to stop and come back to the nomination form, you can do so easily!
  • Enter the information as it is requested.  NOTE: The NOTIFICATION section is for you to list those people who you would like notified if you are selected for ELP. We suggest your chancellor/president/provost and your supervisor(s).
  • When ready, don't forget to hit the SUBMIT button!
  • Contact NACADA at nacada@ksu.edu if you do not receive an e-mail confirming receipt of your nomination after you have completed the online submission process.  If possible, include the application #.

Selection

Review of applications will begin immediately at the close of the application period, with the goal of having the selection process completed and applicants notified as soon as possible.

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Mentors say...

  • Over the past several years, I have had the extraordinary good fortune of working with two 'leaders in training.' This experience has been life altering for me in the sense that I have had the opportunity to meet a number of truly wise and talented people whose commitment to the profession, to their own professional development, and to each other is a lesson in humility and dedication. Some value added to becoming an ELP mentor: from these two relationship-building / mentoring experiences, I have made two dear friends for life. Please join the ELP, if not for yourself, then for the future of the Association.
    Jayne Drake, Temple University, 2007-2009 and 2008-2010 Classes
  • Although this might sound like hyperbole, put simply, this is the most innovative and rewarding program we have put together. You can really make a difference in the lives of new leaders and familiarize them with the guiding principles of NACADA while simultaneously learning from the Emerging Leaders new trends in advising. In my experience, I find the half-hour that I speak with my mentee every Friday morning to be very invigorating. They are the future of the organization.
    Kazi Mamun, University of California-Riverside, 2009-2011 Class
  • My experience as an Emerging Leader mentor has been one of the highlights of my career. I have learned as much from my mentee as I hope he has learned from me. We have a supportive relationship that allows us to challenge each other to fulfill our potentials as leaders in, and contributors to, the field of advising. Our relationship will not stop at the end of the two years in the ELP. Instead, we have built a trust and rapport that I treasure and am committed to continuing to nurture for life.
    Jennifer Bloom, University of South Carolina-Columbia, 2007-2009 Class
  • Rewards are for both the mentor and leader; successful leaders have all had “someone” in a formalized program or not encourage and nurture them to achieve the things they have. Set the stage for the next generation of advisors and leaders in our association.
    Jo Anne Huber, University of Texas-Austin, 2007-2009 Class
  • I chose to apply to the Emerging Leaders Program as a Mentor to give back to someone else. I have been fortunate enough to have numerous mentors in my life that have positively impacted my professional development... Mentoring always seems to me to be a fluid experience. As we mentor our students, staff, colleagues, so too do they mentor us. In some instances the differences in experience can be so marked as to ensure that the flow of information and support is in one direction, but I believe that individuals open to the mentoring process will find out that they can learn from their leaders. The act of mentoring causes us to stop and take stock of our own values, the paths we choose, and what we still have to learn.
    -Karen Sullivan-Vance, Western Oregon University, 2007-2009 Class
  • I knew that I needed to apply to be an ELP Mentor but I hesitated for many years because I didn't know if I could commit the time that was necessary. Now that I am a mentor, I can't believe I waited so long! It has truly been one of the best professional experiences in my career. My mentee  and I talk on a regular basis and have become great friends. I am grateful for having the opportunity to "mentor" her but I have gotten as much out of the experience as she has.
    JP Regalado, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, 2011-2013 Class
  • Although I heard past mentors say the same, I was surprised by how much I felt encouraged to grow by witnessing [my mentee's] example. Seeing her drive, enthusiasm, and undaunted courage has been an inspiration for me in many challenging moments both personally and professionally... . I am honored to have had an opportunity to help and support her during the past two years.
    Laura Mooney, Florida Atlantic University, 2010-2012 Class
  • When I first signed up to be a mentor, I thought of it as a gift I was giving the association; in reality, I have been the one who has received the benefit... I have gained at least as much as I have given. Each time [my mentee] and I talk, I feel rejuvenated – reminded of why we do what we do.
    Karen Archambault, Drexel University, 2012-2014 Class
  • I came into my ELP role with an expectation of myself as investing in a future leader of a NACADA, reflecting on my own professional development to assist another, and realizing further leadership development. I have experienced so much more. This experience has stretched me to grow as a professional and share my experience and knowledge with another. I have learned a tremendous amount through the perspective of another. I would encourage others to serve as a mentor.
    Patricia Griffin, Fort Hayes State University, 2013-2015 Class
  • The mentor role provides opportunity for growth in sometimes unexpected ways. Mentoring another professional requires reflecting on your own career and experiences. It is good to have a structured program that provides space for that type of reflection. Another benefit is spending time with a newer professional whose level of enthusiasm and energy is contagious.
    Jennifer Hodges, New Mexico State University, 2013-2015 Class
  • A lifelong friendship has begun, and I have increased enthusiasm for both my actual job and within NACADA. I have learned much more from my mentee than she has learned from me, and I can only hope she has enjoyed the experience as much as I have.
    Carol Pollard, University of North Texas, 2014-2016 Class
  • I had no idea what to really expect from my ELP involvement. I saw the testimonials and people told me 'you would make a great ELP mentor!' but I did not see myself in that role because I thought mentors in ELP had to be all things to all people. Through intentional and thoughtful interviewing and pre-conference activities and meetings, I realized that I did have a contribution to make. Once we met in person at the annual conference, I understood the process ... This program helped increase my confidence, helped me blossom in my role with NACADA, and provided me with the mechanism of giving back to the organization that has given me so much.
    Teri Farr, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2015-2017 Class

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